Brrrrr Gun Deeee Shudder

Chambolle Musigny Vineyard

The Old BeeDee used to quote his Uncle Geezer whenever he (OBD) was feeling special about something: “quail on toast, nuthin’ like it!

Something similar takes place whenever a “real wine taster” gets around to the subject of Burgundy wines – nuthin’ like ’em. There are certainly other wines we like and favor: like Alto Piemonte and Rioja Rose’s. However, the feeling we get when contemplating Burgs is immediately nostalgic dredging up memories of bottles drained, trepidation for costs to come, forlorn about bottles missed becuz we were too wimpy to meet the price of a ticket to wine Caanan, and unsettling for the possibility that the highest peak in wine consumption – an experience that is always elusive – can never be reached.

We tried once more to scale that slope recently…as we will surely try again and again. Forget the “value.” No U20 wines here. More like U60. How bad do you want it??

The bottles were from the Chambolle Musigny region whose reputation proceeds itself. Musigny is a magic word uttered only in the process of incantation. Moo-zin-yee. Not so much spoken as inhaled. Say it soft and it’s almost like praying.

Two producers lesser known – Domaine Anne Gros and Domaine Patrick Hudelot; but then there are so many more producers in Burgundy who are “lesser known” than the handful that are “known.”

tBoW purchased the DPH bottle from local wine merchant Woodland Hills Wine Co which is our local go-to wine store with a particularly strong Burg selection. This was the last bottle. The $60 price was quite “reasonable” for Chambolle-Musigny. The Anne Gros had been purchased on release along with a few more 2009s. Runki-san, aka tBoW Jr “best palate of any 10 year old”, picked it to go with a humble meal of veggies, rice and swordfish. Wine snobs will tel you great wine really should be drunk on its own. Not really. Great wines go great with a simple meal.

Here are tasting notes from winemaker Anne Gros on her product: 2009 Chambolle Musigny la Combe d’Orveau: this is fine, quite floral bouquet with touches of rose petal and violets accompanying the dark cherry fruit. Good definition – develops a gourmand element with time. The palate has a taut entry, a little brusque even, very linear with chalky tannins towards the more masculine, structured finish.

Here is what tBoW and tBoW Jr. tasted: Powerful nose that is all ripe ripe cherries. Color is deep cherry red with some brick color showing age. It is time to drink this wine. Flavors are rich ripe cherry brandy. Is there such a thing as cherry brandy? Yes from Eastern Europe. If we say “brandy” we mean the alcohol can be detected in the nose. Not a bad thing. The alcohol is sub 14%. Everything in ripe rich fruity balance. If I was a French monk in the 15th century this wine would make me want to do some sinning! The flavor weakened and the brick color grew more pronounced as the wine faded over 40 minutes. Drink it now. This is great pinot noir. We always end up saying “you cannot get these flavors out of pinot noir anywhere else in the world.”

What about the DPH Chambolle (the one we purchased at WHWC)? This wine had plenty of head winds facing its tasting eval; 2 night golf outing with IGTY, lumpen palates, THC laden gummy candy innocently chewed on by an unbeknownst tBoW…not to mention the produce is unknown, unseen and had recently changed his label (at least since 2009). Nevertheless…C hambolle was true to pedigree.

2009 Domaine Patrick Hudelot Chambolle Musigny Beaux Brands: beety flavors (NOT beeFy), more towards the earthy side, weighty drink for Burgundy (the popular term is “legs”), rich dark red robe without any brick showing, held up to the relentless assault on the bottle. Very nice in the masculine style of Burgundy. No forest floor (pooh aromas). No mushrooms (under ripe). Only the delicious beet flavors like the vacuum sealed packs sold at Costco, try those!

Denouement: Burgundy not only makes the best Pinot Noir wines in the world, it really makes the only ones we enjoy drinking. Drink them without food. Drink them with food. Treat these wines like they treat us; with care, pleasure, and in good company that enjoys and knows something about wine.

Dig a little deeper next time you are in a fine wine store like Wine Exchange or Hi Time Wine Cellars in Coata Mesa or Woodland Hills Wine Company. Ask the floor guide to pick out something from Burgundy under $60. Go for it. Let us know.

2 Comments

  1. Wavatar
    Kris-B says:

    Why do you think mushrooms means it was underripe?

  2. Wavatar
    Bacchus says:

    I expect fruit to emerge in wine esp after the vintage is 10 yrs old. However, I have learned this is not necessarily the case. I opened a 2009 Ladoix (reporting next post) which was lean and mean that evening. 24 hours the wine opened up and was much more pleasant. I could be wrong again!

    http://winefolly.com/review/where-wine-flavors-come-from/
    Geosmin: Earth & Mushroom: Geosmin is an organic compound from a type of bacteria. It might just be the most earthy-smelling compound out there. If you love beets, mushrooms and the smell of potting soil then Geosmin is your friend. Soil & Mushroom are common in Old World Wines and some new world wines.

    Another source: https://www.bourgogne-wines.com/boutique/gallery_files/site/12881/13105/13236.pdf

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